th images menu user export search eye clock list list2 arrow-left untitled twitter facebook googleplus instagram cross photos entrep-logo-svg

The 3 Nasty Little Secrets About Teams

Internal competition, poorly designed incentive systems and groupthink can derail your group quickly
By Beth Miller |

The 3 Nasty Little Secrets About Teams

Geber86 | Getty Images

 

In today’s world of business, we all understand the value of teams. Well-functioning teams can collaborate and drive innovation, which is a competitive advantage. Without innovation, many companies wither and die.

 

Iconic brands like Borders and Blockbuster are examples of companies that were unable to adapt quickly enough to the changing competitive landscape. Now you can bet that these companies understood the importance of innovation and had teams focused on the future, but what went wrong? From my experience, three things derail teams -- internal competition, poorly designed incentive systems and groupthink.

 

 

1. Internal competition

When companies have processes and structures that create competition for limited internal resources, things can get ugly quickly. Strong team identity can be a huge benefit to productivity and engagement but only if all of your departments have a single goal that requires cooperation, not competition, amongst the departments. So how do you create the "big goal?"

 

Ideally the big goal is a concept and more abstract. It should speak to your company’s purpose. For example, one PEO company’s big goal was to provide unique human resource solutions to their customers’ problems by listening to customer needs and leveraging unique technology solutions.

Once the company “why” was clear, the CEO facilitated a discussion with each department about what the goal meant for them. They explored the answers to questions like: What are the principles and programs that each department could create and embrace that would assist them in providing unique solutions to customer problems?

 

For the PEO, listening to customers was determined to be a core principal. The CEO met with his executive team to determine what program could be developed for each department that would enhance listening to their customers. In this case, all the executives agreed there were three departments -- sales, customer service and accounting -- that interfaced with customers on an ongoing basis. And, that without the three departments cooperating, they could not deliver unique custom human resource solutions to their customers.

 

Armed with this knowledge, each of the three department leaders were in charge with communicating the big goal and assisting in determining what department goals would drive and support the big goal while requiring the cooperation of the other departments.

 

 

2. Incentive systems

With incentive systems, remember that what you incent and reward others for will drive their behavior and results. The classic example is sales commissions. When the metric for sales commission is revenue, you will have your sales team looking for any sales opportunity. But, if you compensate your sales team by gross margin dollars, your sales team will bring you only profitable sales.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Compensating sales by gross margin dollars may increase profits but it doesn’t help solve the problem of internal competition amongst sales and other departments. What behaviors do you need to increase your sales and profits while focusing on collaboration and innovation?

 

For one technology company, there was one value that all employees within every department lived by that helped drive company growth and profitability -- listening to and solving customer problems. So company leaders proceeded to develop firm goals around listening to customers and driving innovative solutions. Then each department created specific objectives, which linked to the goals and were dependent on the other departments’ cooperation.

 

 

3. Groupthink

Leaders often have strong opinions, which can lead to groupthink. Groupthink discourages perspectives from being challenged and narrows thinking, stifling innovation and organizational competitiveness. In order to manage and break groupthink, a leader needs to listen more than talk during meetings where strategy and innovation are the focus. He/she needs to have dissenter(s) on their teams and encourage and support the dissenters. While team members generally do not like dissenters, they are often the ones who care the most and have the courage to dissent. 

 

As a leader of a team, is your team at risk of groupthink? You can do a quick assessment by asking for feedback from team members on your listening skills. How much time do you spend listening versus talking? When do team members get the opportunity to speak in meetings? What questions are you asking that will lead to exploring alternatives and processing information objectively? Who are the dissenters on your team?  And how do you support and encourage their views and suggestions?

One technique I recommend to team leaders is Six Thinking Hats presented by Edward de Bono in his book by the same title. The method will transform your meetings so that all perspectives are taken into account.

 

Now that you know the derailers of teams, it is time to take action and define goals that drive collaboration across the company, reward teams for working collaboratively and encourage the dissenters on your team. What is your first step?

 

 

*****

 

 

Copyright © 2017 Entrepreneur Media, Inc. All rights reserved.

This article originally appeared on Entrepreneur.com. Minor edits have been done by the Entrepreneur.com.ph editors

Latest Articles

How Much Money Are College Entrance Exam Review Centers Making?

A close look at revenues and profits of MSA Group and AHEAD Learning Systems

byPauline Macaraeg | October 20, 2017 14:00:00

Which PH Tycoons Are Partnering with Their Potential Disruptors?

PwC’s 2017 Philippine Startup Survey says big businesses are tying up with innovative startups

byLorenzo Kyle Subido | October 20, 2017 13:00:00

The Most Common Habit of Self-Made Millionaires

Develop this habit if you sincerely want to retire as a self-made millionaire

byBrian Tracy | October 20, 2017 08:00:00

Sorry, Millennials -- You Are Not Entrepreneurs

Younger entrepreneurs should look to their older counterparts for guidance to be successful

byDavid Meltzer | October 20, 2017 06:00:00

Transform Vulnerability Into Your Wonder Woman Superpower

Being more human may just be the answer to leading superhuman disruption

byDr. Patti Fletcher | October 20, 2017 02:00:00

With 100 Stores and Counting, This Restaurant Proves That "Lutong Bahay" Will Never Go Out of Style

Kuya J opened 100 restaurants in just two years

byTrixie Zabal-Mendoza for Yummy.ph | October 20, 2017 00:00:00

PH Tech Firm Launching Blockchain-Powered Rewards Platform in the US and Thailand

Appsolutely’s LoyalCoin aims to be a unified loyalty program that can be used across different...

byLorenzo Kyle Subido | October 19, 2017 14:00:00

Uratex Founder Natividad Cheng Named PH Entrepreneur of the Year by Ernst & Young

Founders of Cebu Landmasters, Happy Skin Cosmetics and Fruitas also win awards

byPauline Macaraeg | October 19, 2017 11:00:00

Why Job Titles Don't Always Reflect the Value of Employees

What if our job titles moved in real-time, based on the value we are adding to the business instead?

byJeremy Bloom | October 19, 2017 08:00:00

6 Science-Backed Ways to Make Your Office More Productive

Consider adding some Gerbera daisies to your office, plus plenty of natural light and LED lighting

byMoe Kittaneh | October 19, 2017 06:00:00

"The Right Time" Is a Myth. Here's How to Make Every Time Work for You

Life is too uncertain to wait around for the "right time"

byShakir Akorede | October 19, 2017 02:00:00

Where Did the Richest Filipinos Go to School?

Which school produced the most billionaires and millionaires in the Philippines?

bySasha Lim Uy for Esquiremag.ph | October 19, 2017 00:00:00