th images menu user export search eye clock list list2 arrow-left untitled twitter facebook googleplus instagram cross photos entrep-logo-svg

A sud story

Jose Bayotas Jr. would not have been successful making and selling carrot soaps if he allowed his failure with laundry soaps to get him down.
By |
<>Bayotas started sampling his product to friends, relatives, and neighbors. To convince them to buy, he asked them to use his carrot soap alternately with their own brand, and compare both soaps’ effect on their skin. “When they rinsed both off and compared the texture of each cheek, they immediately saw that mine produced better results.”

 

To this day, he continues to give out samples whenever he joins trade exhibits. He tells prospective buyers to wash their face in the rest room to get a feel of his soap. “My soap is not cheap. I don’t want customers to buy and then regret it afterward. So I make sure they see for themselves what they will be getting for their money.” And buy they did. Customers are so sold on Bayotas’s carrot soap that they would often buy in bulk (usually a box of 126 bars).

 

Bayotas prefers to keep his operations – from marketing, advertising, collecting to purchasing – simple. And he strictly does business on a cash basis. “If you want to buy, you pay me, and I give it to you. I don’t take credit. Things are much simpler when you deal in cash. You don’t have collectibles, you don’t have to hire extra people, and you have lesser worries.”

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

 

A simple operation also meant a simple set-up, explaining why Bayotas’s office and laboratory were both home-based. Local customers would buy and pick up the products from his house while buyers from other parts of the country had their orders shipped via air or ocean freight after depositing their payment in his bank account. Most of his customers were dermatologists.

 

Bayotas doesn’t advertise, instead he lets his product’s users be the walking advertisements of the soap’s efficacy. He had in fact encountered some with really bad skin to whom he gave samples. He got his returns when their skin started to clear up. “They ended up becoming good salesmen because of that,” he says.

 


Latest Articles

Close