th images menu user export search eye clock list list2 arrow-left untitled twitter facebook googleplus instagram cross photos entrep-logo-svg

Stop thinking and start doing: The power of practicing more

Here are three reasons why you should prioritize active practice over passive learning.
By James Clear |

laptop

 

We all have goals that we want to achieve in our lives. These goals may include learning a new language, eating healthier and losing weight, becoming a better parent, saving more money, and so on.

 

It can be easy to assume that the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future is caused by a lack of knowledge. We assume that if we knew about a better strategy, then we would get better results. We believe that a new result requires new knowledge.

 

What I’m starting to realize, however, is that new knowledge does not necessarily drive new results. In fact, learning something new can actually be a waste of time if your goal is to make progress and not simply gain additional knowledge.

 

Related: How experts practice better than the rest


It all comes down to the difference between learning and practicing.

 

The difference between learning and practicing

In Thomas Sterner’s book, The Practicing Mind (audiobook), he explains the key difference between practicing and learning.

 

“When we practice something, we are involved in the deliberate repetition of a process with the intention of reaching a specific goal. The words deliberate and intention are keys here because they define the difference between actively practicing something and passively learning it.”
—Thomas Sterner, The Practicing Mind

 

Passive learning creates knowledge. Active practice creates skill.

 

Let’s consider three reasons to prioritize active practice over passive learning.

 

1. Learning can be a crutch that supports inaction.

In many cases, learning is actually a way to avoid taking action on the goals and interests that we say are important to us. For example, let’s say you want to learn a foreign language. Reading a book on how to learn a foreign language quickly allows you to feel like you are making progress. Of course, you’re not actually practicing the action that would deliver your desired outcome (speaking the foreign language).

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

 

woman writing

In situations like this one, we often claim that we are preparing or researching the best method, but these rationalizations allow us to feel like we are moving forward when we are merely spinning our wheels. We make the mistake of being in motion rather than taking action. Learning is valuable until it becomes a form of procrastination.

 

Related: How smart do you have to be to succeed?

 


2. Practice is learning, but learning is not practice.

Passive learning is not a form of practice because although you gain new knowledge, you are not discovering how to apply that knowledge. Active practice, meanwhile, is one of the greatest forms of learning because the mistakes you make while practicing reveal important insights.

 

Even more important, practice is the only way to make a meaningful contribution with your knowledge. You can watch an online course about how to build a business or read an article about a terrible disaster in a developing nation, but that knowledge is unproductive unless you actually launch your business or donate to those in need.

 

 

3. Practice focuses your energy on the process.

The state of your life right now is a result of the habits and beliefs that you have been practicing each day. When you realize this and begin to direct your focus toward practicing better habits day-in and day-out, continual progress will be the logical outcome. It is not the things we learn nor the dreams we envision that determines our results, but rather that habits that we practice each day. 

 

 

The bottom line

Is passive learning useless? Of course not. In many cases, learning for the sake of learning can be a beautiful thing. Not to mention that soaking up new information can help you make more informed decisions when you do decide to take action.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

 

That said, the main point of this article is that learning by itself does not lead to progress. We often hide behind information and use learning as an excuse to delay the more difficult and more important choice of actually doing something. Spend less time passively learning and more time actively practicing. Stop thinking and start doing.

 

Related: When creating new habits, avoid the second mistake

 

 

Copyright 2015 Entrepreneur Media, Inc. All rights reserved.
This article originally appeared on Entrepreneur.com. Minor edits have been done by the Entrepreneur.com.ph editor.

 

Photos from Freedigitalphotos.net (Ohmega1982 and Frame angel)

Latest Articles

Close